Protein S activity in sickle cell anaemia patients in steady state and crisis

Authors

  • Ebele Uche Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Olufunto Kalejaiye Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Festus Olowoselu Department of Haematology and Blood transfusion, College of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Timothy Ekwere Department of Haematology, College of Health Sciences, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State. Nigeria
  • Rafatu Bamiro Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion. General Hospital Marina, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Abdulateef Kareem Department of Family Medicine, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Benjamin Augustine Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Odebiyi Hassan Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Federal Medical Center, Birnin Kudu, Jigawa State, Nigeria
  • Abdulhafeez Balogun Newday Medical Centre, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria
  • Akinsegun Akinbami Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/issn.2454-2156.IntJSciRep20223370

Keywords:

Protein S, Sickle cell anaemia, Crisis, Steady state, Control

Abstract

Background: In sickle cell anaemia, there is an ever-present risk for haemostatic abnormalities which may result in reduced levels of naturally occurring coagulation inhibitors. Protein S is a Vitamin-K dependent, γ-carboxy glutamic acid-containing glycoprotein that potentiates the action of protein C when activated resulting in anticoagulation. This study measured serum Protein S activity in SCA patients during vaso-occlusive crisis and in steady-state, and this was compared with the activity in HbAA controls with a view to establishing if Protein S plays a role in VOC in SCA patients.

Methods: This was an analytical prospective study comprised of 30 HbSS patients and 30 HbAA controls. Using ELISA method, Protein S levels were measured in the HbSS study group during crisis and in the HbAA control group; When the HbSS patients were in steady state, Protein S levels were also measured.

Results: Protein S levels were highest in the HbAA control group (5.27+0.47 ng/ml) followed by the HbSS patients in steady state (5.08+0.56 ng/ml) and lowest in the HbSS patients in crisis (4.96+0.97 ng/ml). However, this difference was not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Protein S levels are reduced in HbSS patients when compared with HbAA controls, and the levels are lower during a VOC compared with steady state.

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Published

2022-12-27

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Original Research Articles