DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/issn.2454-2156.IntJSciRep20161878

Assessment of knowledge and practice towards birth preparedness and complication readiness among women in Northern Ghana: a cross-sectional study

Pius Kaba Affipunguh, Alexander Suuk Laar

Abstract


Background: The principle and practice of birth preparedness and complication readiness (BP&CR) in resource-poor settings have the potential of reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates. The purpose of this study was to assess BP and CR among pregnant women and women who gave birth in the12 months preceding the study and the socio-demographic factors affecting BP and CR.

Methods: The study was a health facility-based cross-sectional survey using pre-tested and structured questionnaires to gather data among 422 currently pregnant women and women who gave birth in the 12 months preceding the study and attending antenatal or postnatal care in health facilities in the Kassena-Nankana Districts in Northern Ghana. Data were analysed using State version 10.

Results: For the 422 respondents, 50% were rural and 50% urban residents. Having at least a primary education and living in a rural area were significantly associated with birth preparedness plan (BPP) (P = 0.044) and (P = 0.007). There was no association between age group, occupation, marital status and religion to BPP (P=0.907), (P=0.397), (P=0.573) and (P=0.564) respectively. The study also revealed that identification of a potential blood donor and a skilled birth attendant were not considered crucial by the respondents.

Conclusions: The study identified poor knowledge and practices of identification of a potential blood donor and skilled birth attendant preparation for birth preparedness and its complication in the study area. Antenatal care education should place emphasis on birth preparedness and complication readiness to improve access to skilled and emergency obstetric care.

Keywords


Birth preparedness, Complication readiness, Antenatal, Postnatal, Women, Ghana

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